1. doctorcrowd:


La Plata (The Silver) is the capital city of the Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Has a population of 740,369 and its metropolitan area has 894,253 inhabitants.
La Plata is a planned city, urban planning paradigm of the late 19th century. It is also an example of “hygiene”, which was becoming important in that time.
The city was awarded at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1889, an event in which the new city was given the two gold medals awarded in the categories “City of the Future” and “Better performance built.”

Source: Wikipedia

    doctorcrowd:

    La Plata (The Silver) is the capital city of the Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Has a population of 740,369 and its metropolitan area has 894,253 inhabitants.

    La Plata is a planned city, urban planning paradigm of the late 19th century. It is also an example of “hygiene”, which was becoming important in that time.

    The city was awarded at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1889, an event in which the new city was given the two gold medals awarded in the categories “City of the Future” and “Better performance built.”

    Source: Wikipedia

    (Source: arghfar)

  2. The International Space Station is about to get its first 3D printer →

  3. hideback:

    Élisée Reclus (French, 1830-1905) and Louis Bonnier (French, 1856-1946)

    Shrine to the Earth for the Exposition Universelle in Paris, 1900

    This enormous, scientifically accurate globe would have stood 418 feet tall. A spiraling ramp would have led viewers along a journey from Antarctica to the North Pole. Proposed in 1895, it was never built. Patrick Geddes called it “no mere scientific model in its institute, but the image, the shrine, and temple of the Earth-mother.” 

  4. Shin Nagoya Thermal Power Plant

    Shin Nagoya Thermal Power Plant

  5. magictransistor:

Justus Dahinden, Urban Structures For The Future, 1972.

    magictransistor:

    Justus Dahinden, Urban Structures For The Future, 1972.

    (Source: found0bjects.blogspot.com)

  6. natgeofound:

The first explorers to descend to the deepest part of the ocean were Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard in the bathyscaphe Trieste, January 23, 1960. 52 years later, James Cameron’s DEEPSEA CHALLENGER journeyed to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, nearly 7 miles below sea level.Photograph courtesy U.S Navy

    natgeofound:

    The first explorers to descend to the deepest part of the ocean were Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard in the bathyscaphe Trieste, January 23, 1960. 52 years later, James Cameron’s DEEPSEA CHALLENGER journeyed to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, nearly 7 miles below sea level.
    Photograph courtesy U.S Navy

  7. The Crazy New ‘Sponge’ That Can Generate Steam From Sunlight →

  8. Destination: Doom →

    China survives, mostly. For those of you on the edge of your seat wanting to know how the global climate crisis turns out, that’s the short answer.

    But to skip to the end would be missing the point of Professor Naomi Oreskes’ latest book, a novella called “The Collapse of Western Civilization.” Because, though the book is fictional, it is fact-based, and the lessons it holds lie not in the fanciful outcome but in how the world gets there.

  9. We’re heading into a jobless future, no matter what the government does →

  10. Why the modern bathroom is a wasteful, unhealthy design →

    “Over 10bn litres of sewage are produced every day in England and Wales. It takes approximately 6.34 GW hours of energy to treat this volume of sewage, almost 1% of the average daily electricity consumption of England and Wales.” You’re not net-zero if you are flushing your waste into the sewer.”

    "In a world where we are running out of fresh water, making artificial fertilizer from fossil fuels and approaching peak phosphorus, it is idiotic and almost criminal that we pay huge amounts in taxes to use drinking water to flush away our personal fertilizer and phosphorus and dump it in the ocean. In the future, they should be paying us."